These two short videos, obtained with the Micron IV, demonstrate the retinal microcirculation dynamics during an active malarial infection.

Micron IV supports observation of systemic infection through dynamic retinal imaging

In a ground breaking paper entitled “Retinal Microcirculation Dynamics During An Active Malarial Infection” workers at the National Institute of Health demonstrated observation of cerebral malaria in the retina of a mouse.

The authors point out that the eye is an extension of the brain and that, in principle, observations of the retina could give information on systemic infections such as CM. The fact that the eye is completely assessable for imaging and shows a multitude of information, creates such a paradigm that has the potential for ready and easy research. This allows the researcher to see that the reflective clumps are retained within the vasculature and do not appear to extravasate.  This type of in-vivo research shows potential for establishing infectious status.

 

 Readily seen in this still image, pictured above, are the hyper-reflective clumps that are confined to the vasculature structure.

Readily seen in this still image, pictured above, are the hyper-reflective clumps that are confined to the vasculature structure.

 “Retinal Microcirculation Dynamics During An Active Malarial Infection”

This poster, presented at ASTMH 2014, by Emile Gordon at the Laboratory of Immunogentics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA, et.al.

Malaria Poster Click here to download more information